Tuesday, March 13, 2012

Indian Peafowl - Yala, Sri Lanka

A photograph of a Peacock taken in Yala, Sri Lanka
Indian Peacock (Pavo cristatus) - Yala, Sri Lanka

Indian Peafowl are a common sight in the dry zone jungles of Sri Lanka and are probably one of the most easily recognisable birds in the area. The male has an unmistakable train of elongated blue and green upper tail covert feathers and a metallic blue crown and neck. The female doesn't have the train of feathers or the same bright plumage.

More photographs inside.

A photograph of a Peacock taken in Yala, Sri Lanka
Indian Peacock (Pavo cristatus) - Yala, Sri Lanka

Peafowl are native to the Indian Subcontinent but have been introduced to many other parts of the world. In Sri Lanka they are common in the dry zone and have adapted to living around areas populated by humans. In India the bird is protected by religious sentiment and can be found foraging around villages and towns.

A photograph of a Peahen taken in Yala, Sri Lanka
Indian Peahen (Pavo cristatus) - Yala, Sri Lanka

The male's tail is fully developed after it reaches the 4 year mark. Interestingly the blue and green colours of the Peacock are not a result of pigmentation but the micro-structure of the feathers themselves. The males are known for raising their train in the shape of a fan and quivering them as part of a courtship display.

A photograph of a Peacock taken in Yala, Sri Lanka
Indian Peafowl (Pavo cristatus) - Yala, Sri Lanka

Peafowls forage in small groups called musters which usually consist of a Peacock and 3 - 5 Peahens during the breeding season and only Peahens and young. Their diet consists of berries, grain, snakes, lizards and small rodents. They are most active at dawn and dusk and tend to stay hidden during the heat of the day. When disturbed they prefer to run through the undergrowth and will avoid taking flight.

A photograph of a Peacock taken in Yala, Sri Lanka
Indian Peafowl (Pavo cristatus) - Yala, Sri Lanka

All the photographs on this post were taken with the Canon 7D and the 100-400mm lens. Unfortunately I didn't see any Peacocks with raised feathers during this trip. 




 
Share on Facebook
Post a Comment