Thursday, June 9, 2011

Brown Ringlet

Brown Ringlet - Hypocysta metirius
Brown Ringlet - Hypocysta metirius

I photographed a number of Brown Ringlets while I was up at the Barrington Tops. Since I was out early almost every morning I managed to photograph them while they warmed up in the early morning sun. Due to the fact that they were still "warming up", I was able to get really close to the butterfly. Having the 100-400mm lens on also helped.

More images after the jump.

Brown Ringlet - Hypocysta metirius
Brown Ringlet - Hypocysta metirius

The Brown Ringlet is a small butterfly and has a wingspan of around 55mm. I would have liked to get a bit closer to photograph them but was restricted by the minimum focusing distance on the 100-400mm lens. It would have been good to use the 100mm lens to photograph them but I didn't want to missout by going indoors to change the lens,

Brown Ringlet - Hypocysta metirius
Brown Ringlet - Hypocysta metirius

I'm not sure how other photographers set about photographing butterflies. Do they approach butterflies once they settle on a plant or do they set up hides and wait for the butterfly to settle? The second option could be time consuming and may lead to people "baiting" the butterflies. I've never baited animals for photography before and I am not too keen to start it now.  What do you guys think?

Brown Ringlet - Hypocysta metirius
Brown Ringlet - Hypocysta metirius

All photographs on this post were captured with the Canon 7D and the 100-400mm lens.
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1 comment:

Gallicissa said...

This one reminds me of our own Glad-eye Bushbrown. Nice one.

As you know I use the same lens as you 100-400mm for butterfly photography. This is party because the results are satisfactory and partly because I cannot be bothered to remove lenses all the time because I often do photography in an opportunistic sort of a way when I am guiding tours.

I would first take a shot from the distance as a record. And then I would inch in step by step to improve upon that (if that is possible). Taking rapid bursts also helps when it comes to faster Swallowtail butterflies.

With my years of experience in chasing them, I believe my "field craft" has improved than before, so that I can get closer to them without spooking them. I don't bait them. Nor do I use hides.

If I find a good nectaring tree in good light, I would stay there at a favourable light and photographic angle. Soon, you sort of become part of the landscape, and the thirsty butterflies are left with no option but to ignore you!